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      Elderly are usually misunderstood as weak or fragile. But long before, during a bus hijack an elderly was attacked but an old woman ( the bus driver ) tricked the hijacker. The tape that recorded on the bus showed how the bus driver tells the hijacker to look at the side doors as she will lock the front doors, but instead she gave the advantage to the ones riding the bus to escape. However, her genius plan later traps the hijacker. While the hijacker stop at the side door of the bus, the bus driver quickly leaves the bus as the only person that was in the bus was the hijacker. That was not it, because the hijacker have no idea how to open the doors since the elderly bus driver locked the door on the way of sprinting out. The hijacker tries to drive away, but the bus driver also somehow took out the source of the bus on the way out. So the hijacker was later on arrested as the bus driver was interviewed on what had just happened.
  
''An Addition to Organs''
 
  
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      13 miles east of Yosemite National Park, an ancient lake called Mono Lake which retrieves salt and minerals from a stream called Sierra Stream. All these materials creates a substance which is a calcium carbonated spices called tufa towers which rises majorly from water. Tufa tower later leaves salt which is twice as salty as the oceans. This gives it a chance to attract people to buoyant swim during warmer summer months. In winter the snow glitters on the tufts.
          Scientists believe that they may have found a possible new organ, the interstitium. To begin with, the interstitium is a network of tissues that wrap around the digestive tract. However, they rediscovered that there were fluid-filled sacs.  As stated in the document, "When researchers took a closer look at this stuff with out squishing it down, that's when they identified the network of fluid-filled sacs."  Additionally, organs are defined as self-contained and sufficient, but the interstitium isn't an organ yet. Moreover, if it were an organ, it could help figure out mechanisms in the body that aren't still fully understood.  The author comments, "Understanding better how this system works may enable us to find new ways to treat or prevent all these diseases..."  To sum up, the interstitium may be a useful piece of discovery scientists can observe to become more knowledgeable of the human body.
 
  
  
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    Near a volcano called Kilauea, islands have been forming near it. It is located near Hawaii where other tiny islands are forming. An island of lava was discovered on a Thursday, on the the northern edge of the Big Island. A Hawaii Volcano Observatory crew noticed the island on a Friday morning flight. The island is a part of lava flow that extends underwater away from the coastline. The agency said that the underwater pressure pushed lava up forming the island which is common and it’s called a tumulus.
'''Fractional-Dose Yellow Fever Vaccination — Advancing the Evidence Base'''
 
In 2016, a global shortage of yellow fever vaccine occurred as a result of major yellow fever outbreaks in Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). By October, 7136 cases and 493 deaths were reported in the two countries. Reactive vaccination campaigns were conducted in areas with autochthonous transmission during the summer of 2016, but many people were still living in areas of risk. In Kinshasa, the capital of the DRC, a preventive campaign targeting roughly 10.5 million people was needed to mitigate the risk of an urban yellow fever outbreak. However, only 5.8 million vaccine doses were available from the World Health Organization (WHO) stockpile. A solution was urgently needed.
 
Fractionating the available yellow fever vaccine doses and administering a reduced volume of vaccine was one proposal. Faced with the options of using off-label fractional-dose vaccine to meet the supply needs or using the full-dose vaccine but leaving millions of people at risk for yellow fever, the DRC, in close consultation with the WHO, opted to use one fifth of the standard 0.5 ml volume of vaccine (0.1 ml) in its vaccination campaign. More than 7 million people received the fractional-dose vaccine in Kinshasa in August 2016.
 
This decision was based on simple math. WHO-prequalified yellow fever vaccines are highly potent, with average doses between 12,874 and 43,651 international units (IU) — far above the WHO’s recommended minimum of 1000 IU. In principle, the quantity of vaccine virus in fractional doses of standard vaccine would therefore still exceed the WHO’s minimum requirement.
 
But fractionating yellow fever vaccine doses is not without complexity. Average doses vary substantially among vaccine manufacturers and among product batches from a given manufacturer. Fractionating doses from vaccine vials at the lower end of the dosage range could result in doses close to or below the WHO minimum. Furthermore, potency can wane when vaccines are nearing the end of their shelf life, which for WHO-prequalified yellow fever vaccines is 36 months. Even the WHO’s recommended minimum dose must be regarded with some caution, since it is based on studies in animals rather than rigorous dose-finding studies in humans. Thus, it is important to ensure that the immunogenicity of fractional doses is equivalent to that of standard doses of currently used vaccines.
 
At the time of the 2016 outbreak, there were three publications from two studies on the safety and immunogenicity of fractional-dose yellow fever vaccine administered through the recommended route (intramuscular or subcutaneous). Since the older study was based on a vaccine formulation no longer in use, the primary study that informed the WHO recommendations was a dose–response study conducted in Brazil in 2009, using a vaccine produced by Bio-Manguinhos.1 In that study, 900 men were randomly assigned to receive one of six de-escalating doses of the 17DD yellow fever vaccine, ranging from 27,476 to 31 IU. Thirty days after vaccination, seroconversion rates were 97 to 99% for vaccine doses of 587 IU or higher. Among people who originally seroconverted, more than 97% of those who received vaccine doses of 158 IU or higher still had detectable antibodies roughly 10 months after vaccination. An analysis of the cellular immune response showed equivalence to the full dose down to the tested dose of 3013 IU, but not at doses of 587 IU or lower.2 Although these data were considered reassuring, they were restricted to a single country, manufacturer, and population (male adults).
 
In the context of the emergency situation and vaccine shortage, the WHO considered these data sufficient to proceed with a fractional-dose vaccination campaign. Full-dose vaccination was still recommended for young children and pregnant women.
 
The WHO published its official position on fractional-dose yellow fever vaccination in June 2017. The agency recommends fractional-dose vaccination during a yellow fever outbreak only if there is a shortage of full-dose vaccine and emergency-response needs exceed the capacity of the global stockpile. Furthermore, it is still recommended that some groups, such as children less than 2 years of age and pregnant women, receive the full-dose vaccine, given the lack of data demonstrating the safety and immunogenicity of fractional doses. Because of limited data on duration of protection, fractional-dose vaccination also does not qualify people for international travel under the International Health Regulations, a document signed by 196 countries to help the international community prevent and respond to acute public health risks. Without assurances that a fractional-dose vaccine provides the same lifetime protection as a full-dose vaccine, people who receive fractional doses will need to be revaccinated before traveling to countries where yellow fever is endemic and where the International Health Regulations require proof of vaccination.
 
In light of important knowledge gaps related to fractional-dose vaccination, the WHO developed a research agenda to stimulate scientists, policymakers, funders, and industry to address policy-relevant research questions (see box). The global community immediately responded. A small observational study conducted during the August 2016 fractional-dose yellow fever vaccination campaign in the DRC demonstrated 98% seroconversion among people who were seronegative at the time of vaccination.3Participants from the dose-finding study by Bio-Manguinhos1 were reexamined to assess long-term immunogenicity: of 318 participants who seroconverted after vaccination in the original study, 85% were still seropositive 8 years later.4 A randomized noninferiority trial was recently launched comparing seroconversion after fractional-dose and full-dose yellow fever vaccination for each WHO-prequalified vaccine product (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02991495). This study will evaluate fractional-dose vaccination in adults living with HIV and in children. Other studies are examining the immunogenicity of fractional-dose vaccines in children, using various fractional volumes and routes of administration.
 
Use of fractional-dose vaccination in mass vaccination campaigns presents an opportunity to compare the safety of fractional-dose and full-dose yellow fever vaccines — particularly rates of rare, serious adverse events such as vaccine-associated neurotropic and viscerotropic disease. Preliminary data from routine safety monitoring during campaigns involving more than 5 million people in Brazil who received a fractional-dose vaccine are reassuring.
 
The 2016 outbreak in central and southern Africa was a reminder of the delicate supply-and-demand situation for yellow fever vaccines. Beyond the WHO vaccine stockpile, there is limited capacity to respond to demand peaks during larger outbreaks. Limited market incentives and a long manufacturing process requiring embryonated chicken eggs have created barriers to market entry and manufacturing surge capacity.
 
Recently, another vaccine shortage has prompted fractional-dose vaccination campaigns in large cities in Brazil, including areas not previously recognized as being at risk for yellow fever and thus with largely susceptible populations. Although the yellow fever vaccine stockpile is in place to address peaks in demand, it is less suited to cover the surge capacity needed for major urban vaccination campaigns. During the 2016 outbreak, the stockpile was depleted three times. Compounding this problem is the fact that global vaccine coverage is well below the 80% target that is expected to maintain a sufficiently high level of population immunity to eliminate outbreak risk: a recent study estimated that at least 393.7 million people living in high-risk settings (43%) remain unvaccinated.5 International air travel may introduce yellow fever virus to new cities suitable for transmission. The best defense against future vaccine shortages is to achieve adequate routine vaccine coverage in all affected areas.
 
Other countries have considered a broader application of fractional-dose yellow fever vaccination outside emergency shortages. However, core questions remain. Although available evidence supports the use of fractional-dose vaccination when needed, a larger evidence base will be important to ensure optimal use and protection. Ongoing studies will provide much-needed information about specific products, target populations, and duration of protection to strengthen vaccination policies.
 
Continued dialogue and coordination among the policy, research, and funding communities are critical to ensure that when public health emergencies arise, there is sufficient evidence to make robust policy decisions quickly. Policy-driven research agendas are important tools for facilitating such coordination.
 
  
Summary:
 
        In the Democratic Republic of Congo, the yellow fever outbreak emerged a new problem.  To begin with, the vaccine doses  supplied from the World Health Organization (WHO) for 10.5 million people, wasn't enough.  To be clearer, only 5.8 million vaccine doses from the WHO could be supplied because of regulations.  Moreover, the government resolved to fractional - doses of one-fifth of the standard 0.5 ml volume of the vaccine, or 0.1 ml.  However, fractional - doses should be used with caution.  As stated in the text, "Average doses vary substantially among vaccine manufacturers and among product batches.."  This sparked more studies to be conducted on the immunogenicity of fractional - doses.  In conclusion, global vaccine coverage isn't enough for situations like this.
 
  
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    Technology has been increasing and become better than the original. People know what cars are, but have they ever heard of a flying car? Kitty Hawk funded by Google cofounder Larry Page and led by Thrun, teased its Flyer prototype. Now a girl named Rachel experiments the flying car even though she doesn’t have a pilot license. After the experiment, the flying car was actually perfect and rideable. That was not only it because the flying car could run 20mph and go more than 25 miles. People would expect it to be difficult to drive but it’s easy as playing Minecraft since there’s only a joystick to drive the car.
  
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'''Oropharyngeal Tularemia from Freshly Pressed Grape Must'''
 
In high-income countries, oropharyngeal tularemia is associated with hunting or eating infected game or drinking contaminated water.1,2 We describe a cluster of cases of oropharyngeal tularemia that appears to have been caused by the consumption of freshly pressed grape must by grape harvesters volunteering at a vineyard in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, in October 2016. At this vineyard, owned by vintner 1, the grapes were collected mechanically (sort 1A) and by hand (sort 1B), and each lot was pressed separately. After the grapes were pressed, the harvesters tasted the fresh must from sort 1A. The same mechanical harvester was then used to collect grapes at another vineyard (owned by vintner 2). These grapes (sort 2C) were processed at a winery owned by vintner 2. Apart from the mechanical harvester used to collect the grapes, there was no link between the wineries owned by vintners 1 and 2.
 
Among the total of 29 harvesters who worked for vintner 1, six harvesters — two women and four men (median age, 24.5 years; interquartile range, 10.3 to 39.5) — became ill, with swollen cervical lymph nodes, fever, chills, difficulty swallowing, and diarrhea, within 4 to 8 days after the suspected exposure. In each of these six harvesters, antibodies to the Francisella tularensis lipopolysaccharide were detected on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, a finding that was confirmed on Western blot analysis (for additional details on the tests used, see the Supplementary Appendix, available with the full text of this letter at NEJM.org).3 We interviewed vintner 1 and visited his vineyard and his winery 1 to recreate the events that occurred during the harvest. In addition, we obtained samples of the new wine from both vintners: sorts 1A and 1B, from vintner 1, and sort 2C, from vintner 2. We conducted a retrospective cohort study and defined cases as those in which there was laboratory-confirmed tularemia with onset of self-reported symptoms up to 14 days after the event. Serologic testing was offered to all harvesters, and a structured questionnaire was used to ascertain potential exposures and symptoms among all participants. This study was conducted within the legal mandate of the Landesuntersuchungsamt Rheinland-Pfalz, Koblenz, and the Robert Koch Institute, Berlin, both in Germany.
 
Table 1.
 
Risk Factors for Seropositive Oropharyngeal Tularemia in a Cohort of Grape Harvesters, October 2016.
 
Incidence risk ratios were calculated with the use of Poisson regression (for details, see the Supplementary Appendix). In the multivariable analysis, we found that drinking fresh must from sort 1A was the only significant predictor for the acquisition of tularemia (incidence risk ratio calculated with exact Poisson regression = 13.5; P=0.01) (Table 1). The attack rate for drinking fresh must was 75% (6 of 8 harvesters), which in turn could explain 100% of the cases (6 of 6).
 
Table 2.
 
Results of Environmental Testing of New Wine for the Francisella tularensis Gene Tul4.
 
DNA from F. tularensis subspecies holarctica was identified by means of polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assay and its content quantified in new wine made from grapes pressed on the same day (Table 2). Grapes from sort 1B (in which 440 genome equivalents per milliliter were detected) were pressed after those from sort 1A (16,849 genomic equivalents per milliliter), which suggests that cross-contamination occurred in the press at winery 1. In the winery owned by vintner 2, 1 genomic equivalent per milliliter was identified in sort 2C, which had been pressed from grapes collected by the same mechanized harvester used earlier that same day by vintner 1, a finding that suggests that the harvester was the source of cross-contamination. On the basis of quantitative PCR results, we estimated that 109 to 1010 bacteria had contaminated 730 liters of must pressed from the grapes in sort 1A, indicating substantial contamination with F. tularensis.
 
Sequencing analyses provided evidence of DNA from wood mice (apodemus species) in wine made from sort 1A, and vintners confirmed the occasional presence of rodents in mechanically collected grapes. We infer that an infected rodent may have been collected by the harvester and pressed with the grapes in sort 1A, thereby infecting humans through contaminated must. This outbreak suggests that mechanical harvesting can be a risk factor for the transmission of zoonoses such as tularemia and that raw food stuffs should be treated before consumption. In this instance, all contaminated products were confiscated and their sale prohibited by public health and other local authorities.4,5
 
  
Summary:
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      People have made many high tech tachnology such as cars, computers, flying cars, robots, and machinery. But who know they made a robot version of a man’s best friend. People usually refer a man’s best friends as puppies and dogs. But it’s true, scientist are deciding if they should put a prototype experimented robotic dog for sale in 2019. It would have many commands such as going to areas, you want it to go. The robotic dog is impressive since it could also lift boxes, go for a walk, and run very fast. However the robodog is awesome since it doesn’t only run but it rideable. The robot dog has functions that allows you to drive the dog and has many other cool functions. Well scientist wants to sell these to people’s house as soon as they can. It’s coming out on 2019!
          Six harvesters fell ill of "tularensis" in a vineyard.  Firstly, there was an occurrence of cross-contamination in Winery 1.  For instance, a harvester was the source of the cause of the cross-contamination from drinking must.  According to the text, "In the multivariable analysis, we found that drinking fresh must from sort 1A was the only significant predictor for the acquisition of tularemia..."  An inference was made that an infected rodent may have been pressed in with the grapes by the same harvester who drank the fresh must.  As stated in the text, "We infer that an infected rodent may have been collected by the harvester and pressed with the grapes in sort 1A, thereby infecting humans through contaminated must."  Therefore, mechanical harvesting can be a risky factor in which the transmission of a disease from animals to humans.
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7/18/18 "A Parallel Universe of Clinical Trials"
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    Have you ever believed in a miracle, well a 13 year old has experienced one. As a kid, he hanged out with his friend at the friend’s house as they rode a buggy. However, little did he know that the friend pressed on the brakes to stop as Trenton flew out the buggy hitting his head. Trenton was rushed to USA Medical Center and found out he had seven skull fractures. That wasn’t it since the doctor said they didn’t know if they could fix him. So the parents were convinced to sign a paper to donate his organs to other kids before he dies. However, a miracle occurs to Trenton as he regains consciousness and woke up. Luckily, Trenton was patched up and was alright just in time before the doctor took out his organs.
A recent clinical trial of a herpes simplex virus vaccine allegedly violated fundamental scientific, regulatory, and ethical safeguards. This case opens a window into a parallel universe that spurns the current system of clinical trial oversight in the United States and supports broad right-to-try laws allowing patients access to experimental therapies.
 
A faculty member at Southern Illinois University, William Halford, who had a Ph.D. in immunology and microbiology, injected volunteers with a live attenuated herpes simplex virus vaccine he had developed, without approval from an institutional review board (IRB), submission of an investigational new drug application to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), or formal informed consent from participants, according to investigative journalists.1 Halford administered the vaccine first to himself and later allegedly to participants in a hotel off campus. In 2016, the 17 participants were flown to St. Kitts and Nevis for vaccine injections. Results of the trial have not been published in a peer-reviewed journal. Halford died of cancer in 2017.
 
The trial sponsor, a company called Rational Vaccines, was cofounded by Halford and the Oscar-winning producer Agustín Fernández III. According to Fernández, working in the film industry is good training for running a nontraditional pharmaceutical company because it requires thinking outside the box. Peter Thiel, the technology entrepreneur and investor and outspoken critic of the FDA, invested in the company; he stipulated, however, that future studies adhere to FDA requirements.
 
After Kaiser Health News broke the story of the vaccine trial and Senator Chuck Grassley (R-IA) prodded the federal Office for Human Research Protections, the university launched an investigation. To date, Southern Illinois University — which holds the patent on the vaccine — has admitted serious noncompliance with university policies and federal regulations but says the investigator hid his actions from the school. Its investigation continues, and the FDA has reportedly opened a criminal investigation into Halford’s research. The government of St. Kitts and Nevis said that required approvals had not been obtained, and it is conducting its own investigation. Although no deaths or hospitalizations have been reported among trial participants, three participants have sued the study sponsor. Another participant said that after he received the vaccine series, his herpes outbreaks decreased in frequency and intensity and eventually stopped.2 Rational Vaccines, whose website currently has no content, told a journalist that it will continue to develop the vaccine and seek approval in countries around the world while following “international good clinical practice standards.
 
This clinical trial allegedly violated two fundamental standards for protecting research participants: IRB approval of the trial protocol and informed consent from participants. Before a trial can proceed, an IRB must determine that the risks to participants are reasonable and minimized through the use of sound research design and also must approve a consent form that covers topics specified in FDA regulations. These standards are required by the FDA for clinical trial protocols submitted to support marketing of new products and by the Good Clinical Practice guidelines, which harmonize regulations in the United States, the European Union, and Japan. Like most institutions, Southern Illinois University requires that all research involving human participants carried out by its faculty and staff must comply with federal regulations regarding protection of human subjects, including research that is not federally funded or is conducted off campus.
 
Although many people in the biomedical field support reducing regulatory burdens for new therapies, the Halford case has triggered calls to abolish IRB review and radically redefine consent for clinical trials. A parallel free-market and libertarian universe staunchly defends the herpes vaccine trial, its principal investigator, and its rationale. Supporters of this movement make several arguments.
 
First, they contend that patients should have the liberty to make their own decisions about research participation, without experts or government officials trying to “protect” them. An article on the website of the free-market group Foundation for Economic Education declares that the current drug-approval system “assumes that you and your doctor are not smart enough to access relevant data and make informed decisions about the use of not-yet-approved drugs, decisions attuned to your unique health conditions and preferences.”3
 
Second, they argue that current FDA and IRB regulations harm patients by stifling and delaying innovative new treatments in order to protect vested interests, including those of established scientists and research institutions. Under the current administration, these libertarian ideas are driving policy. Right-to-try laws backed by the Goldwater Institute have been enacted nationally and in most states. The free-market Heartland Institute, which supports the herpes vaccine trial and its investigator, urges sweeping deregulation of new therapies. Before the passage of the federal right-to-try law, leaders of the institute wrote, “Many of those cheering this pending legislation have been working to restructure the FDA’s monopoly on access to new drugs far beyond just the terminally-ill patients covered by Right To Try.”4
 
Third, supporters of Halford believe that scientists whose work has been rejected by peer reviewers or who violate regulatory requirements are courageous heroes. The president of the Foundation for Economic Education praised Halford as “a genius who challenged conventional wisdom, blazed new trails in scientific research, dedicated his life to helping others, developed promising new tools against a terrible affliction, and lighted a path for the policy changes needed to end the suffering of millions.”5 According to these arguments, researchers’ assertions about proposed treatments can replace peer review, even when their claims lack supporting trustworthy evidence.
 
Advocates of evidence-based standards for new therapies might dismiss libertarian and free-market arguments for dismantling these standards. But the latter views are politically ascendant today. An effective response would heed valuable lessons from the groups that embrace such views.
 
To gain broader public support, the medical research community should listen to and respond to the concerns that lead patients to seek untested therapies, including deep frustration over the lack of effective treatments, perceived disrespect, and marginalization of their needs. Libertarian groups have tapped into such emotions effectively.
 
The community could develop a memorable and succinct mission statement — perhaps something like, “getting patients and their physicians the information they need to decide on treatments.” Making the case for evidence-based standards for new treatments in terms the public understands is also important. Personal stories and cases can grip the attention of readers or listeners, as disease advocacy groups have demonstrated. The plight of patients who need better treatments must then be connected to the need for credible information about the effectiveness and safety of proposed treatments. Evidence-based standards are tools to help patients and their physicians decide whether claims about a given treatment are supported by data. To make informed decisions, patients need access to the protocols and main results of all pertinent clinical trials, including trials that are unpublished or did not favor the intervention.
 
Finally, although scientists might balk at reducing complex issues to short and simple points, effective communication has helped libertarian and free-market advocates change laws. Such groups strategically target crucial stakeholders, including state and federal legislators, and work with like-minded organizations. Supporters of evidence-based medicine should do the same. Partnering with patient-oriented groups such as the Michael J. Fox Foundation, the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, and the Genetic Alliance can broaden support for sound evidence regarding potential new treatments. Such organizations, which are accelerating drug development, have substantial public credibility and cannot be criticized as protecting the vested interests of scientists, research institutions, or drug companies.
 
The Halford case is one example of ongoing zealous attacks on standards for clinical trials. In response, champions of evidence-based standards for new therapies must convincingly demonstrate that they are addressing patients’ needs. Otherwise, their views will not resonate with the public.
 
Summary:
 

Revision as of 16:42, 21 July 2018

     Elderly are usually misunderstood as weak or fragile. But long before, during a bus hijack an elderly was attacked but an old woman ( the bus driver ) tricked the hijacker. The tape that recorded on the bus showed how the bus driver tells the hijacker to look at the side doors as she will lock the front doors, but instead she gave the advantage to the ones riding the bus to escape. However, her genius plan later traps the hijacker. While the hijacker stop at the side door of the bus, the bus driver quickly leaves the bus as the only person that was in the bus was the hijacker. That was not it, because the hijacker have no idea how to open the doors since the elderly bus driver locked the door on the way of sprinting out. The hijacker tries to drive away, but the bus driver also somehow took out the source of the bus on the way out. So the hijacker was later on arrested as the bus driver was interviewed on what had just happened.


     13 miles east of Yosemite National Park, an ancient lake called Mono Lake which retrieves salt and minerals from a stream called Sierra Stream. All these materials creates a substance which is a calcium carbonated spices called tufa towers which rises majorly from water. Tufa tower later leaves salt which is twice as salty as the oceans. This gives it a chance to attract people to buoyant swim during warmer summer months. In winter the snow glitters on the tufts.


    Near a volcano called Kilauea, islands have been forming near it. It is located near Hawaii where other tiny islands are forming. An island of lava was discovered on a Thursday, on the the northern edge of the Big Island. A Hawaii Volcano Observatory crew noticed the island on a Friday morning flight. The island is a part of lava flow that extends underwater away from the coastline. The agency said that the underwater pressure pushed lava up forming the island which is common and it’s called a tumulus.


    Technology has been increasing and become better than the original. People know what cars are, but have they ever heard of a flying car? Kitty Hawk funded by Google cofounder Larry Page and led by Thrun, teased its Flyer prototype. Now a girl named Rachel experiments the flying car even though she doesn’t have a pilot license. After the experiment, the flying car was actually perfect and rideable. That was not only it because the flying car could run 20mph and go more than 25 miles. People would expect it to be difficult to drive but it’s easy as playing Minecraft since there’s only a joystick to drive the car.


     People have made many high tech tachnology such as cars, computers, flying cars, robots, and machinery. But who know they made a robot version of a man’s best friend. People usually refer a man’s best friends as puppies and dogs. But it’s true, scientist are deciding if they should put a prototype experimented robotic dog for sale in 2019. It would have many commands such as going to areas, you want it to go. The robotic dog is impressive since it could also lift boxes, go for a walk, and run very fast. However the robodog is awesome since it doesn’t only run but it rideable. The robot dog has functions that allows you to drive the dog and has many other cool functions. Well scientist wants to sell these to people’s house as soon as they can. It’s coming out on 2019!


    Have you ever believed in a miracle, well a 13 year old has experienced one. As a kid, he hanged out with his friend at the friend’s house as they rode a buggy. However, little did he know that the friend pressed on the brakes to stop as Trenton flew out the buggy hitting his head. Trenton was rushed to  USA Medical Center and found out he had seven skull fractures. That wasn’t it since the doctor said they didn’t know if they could fix him. So the parents were convinced to sign a paper to donate his organs to other kids before he dies. However, a miracle occurs to Trenton as he regains consciousness and woke up. Luckily, Trenton was patched up and was alright just in time before the doctor took out his organs.