Today is: loading ...
loading ...
- Source: loading ...
 
(39 intermediate revisions by 2 users not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
<br> Armored dinosaur found
+
<br> The Eastern quoll nearly gets extinct.
 +
<br> The Eastern quoll, an adorable little spotted Australian Marsupial, went extinct fifty years ago in the mainland of Australia.
 +
<br> Quolls certainly have a signature look, a face of a mouse, ears of a lemur, a cat-like body and white polka dots on their thick fur.
 +
<br> Quolls are nocturnal and are not picky eaters; they eat insects or carrion, and will hunt rats, rabbits, birds, and lizards—even animals larger than themselves.
 +
<br> For the first time in five decades, the eastern quoll has been introduced back into the wild.
 +
<br> Forty quolls were moved from Tasmania to the Booderee National Park to ensure a increase in this population.
 +
<br> Website: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/08/animals-Australia-quolls-marsupials-extinct-reproduction/
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
----
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
<br> Reasons why Rhinos are having a hard time
 +
<br> Since rhinos are endangered, finding a mate is harder for them.
 +
<br> They live in four isolated regions scattered across 10,000 square miles so even finding another is difficult.
 +
<br> Many wildlife organizations are teaming up to breed rhinos in sanctuaries and increase the population of them.
 +
<br> Due to poaching, as many as seventy percent of the rhino decreased through the years.
 +
<br> A island in Indonesia called Sumatra has less than seventy-five rhinos in the whole place.
 +
<br> The population of those rhinos decreased hugely.
 +
<br> Website: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/10/explore-atlas-sumatran-rhino-critically-endangered-conservation/
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
----
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
<br> Is shark an ingredient in your cosmetics?
 +
<br> It is known that millions of deep-sea sharks are killed for multimillion dollar industries every year but there has also been found in sunscreen, lipstick, foundation, lotion, and many other cosmetics.
 +
<br> Common ingredients for cosmetics is oil, known as squalene, derived from shark livers.
 +
<br> Squalene is a key moisturizing agent for it is high in antioxidants and fatty acid.
 +
<br> Shark-sourced squalene can be found in other types of consumer goods, such as vaccines but ninety percent is used in cosmetics.
 +
<br> Thankfully, many corporations in the western world have made the switch to plant-based squalane, even though it is about thirty percent more expensive to produce.
 +
<br> Website: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/07/sharks-news-cosmetics-squalene-health/
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
----
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
<br> A tiny new species of pygmy seahorse.
 +
<br> In the boulder-strewn coasts of Japan, researchers have discovered tiny seahorses that are the size of a grain of rice.
 +
<br> These creatures camouflage with the algae-covered rocks and at first glance look they look like floating debris in the water.
 +
<br> Scientists have named the seahorse Hippocampus japapigu, Latin for “Japan pig”.
 +
<br> Graham Short, an ichthyologist at the California Academy of Sciences says that it is “because to the locals, it resembles a tiny baby pig”.
 +
<br> Although they are tiny and hard to find because of their appearance, they are not rare.
 +
<br> Website: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/08/tiny-pygmy-seahorse-discovered-japan-news/
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
----
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
<br> Pet-fox DNA tells us a lot about dogs and humans.
 +
<br> In 1959, a man named Dmitri Belyaev started a experiment on how dog’s get trained and domesticated.
 +
<br> So, for almost sixty years Russian scientists have been breeding pet-foxes to be tame or aggressive.
 +
<br> Biologists believed that domestic dogs were descended from wolves, however they didn’t know how all the anatomical, physiological, and behavioral differences between the two animals could arise.
 +
<br> Belyaev had believed that breeding the friendliest foxes together would perhaps become domesticated.
 +
<br> His idea was correct and he got the most fearless tame foxes that are similar to how dogs interact with humans.
 +
<br> Website: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/08/fox-dogs-wild-tame-genetics-study-news/
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
----
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
<br> Ancient way of catching fish.
 +
<br> The ancient Japanese fishing method that uses birds to catch fish is called ukai.
 +
<br> Even though this method has been around for 1,300 years, it is now practiced because it is a popular tourist attraction.
 +
<br> Fishers get the fish by placing a tie on the cormorant’s neck and attaching a leash on the bird.
 +
<br> This way when the cormorants catch the fishes, they can only swallow the small fishes and the big fishes in their mouths get taken by the fisher.
 +
<br> Actor Charlie Chaplin has also described this method as “Japan’s highest art form”.
 +
<br> Website: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/08/ukai-comorant-fishing-japan-news/
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
----
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
<br> Breeding reorganized dog’s brains.
 +
<br> Since the first wolf was domesticated an estimated 12,000 years ago, variety of dogs were bred and many more different kinds of dogs were made.
 +
<br> A new brain-imaging study examined the carcasses of eleven different dogs and breeds.
 +
<br> Scientists found that the brains of many short-snouted breeds have shifted forwards about fifteen degrees.
 +
<br> Researchers say that this perhaps significantly alters the dogs' all-important source of smell.
 +
<br> It is a wonder on how breeding can change a something like a sense of smell; researchers say that is a question to look forward into.
 +
<br> Website: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/08/100803-dogs-brains-changed-breeding-science/
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
----
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
<br> Can dogs feel our emotions?
 +
<br> It is already known that sometimes dogs yawn when they see others yawn but they don’t know if it is considered a form of empathy or mild stress, as yawning can be caused by anxiety.
 +
<br> In a test it was determined that not only did the dog yawn more to their owners but also yawned less to fake yawns.
 +
<br> In a similar study before, scientists claimed that people yawn more when people they care about yawn.
 +
<br> So, they believe that contagious yawning is a form of empathizing with people experiencing a feeling.
 +
<br> Elisabetta Palagi, of the Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies in Rome, says "This could be the result of a long process of domestication.”
 +
<br> Website: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/08/130808-yawning-dogs-contagious-animals-empathy-science/
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
----
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
<br> Why Are Dogs So Friendly?
 +
<br> Dogs are more sociable than their wild cousins, the wolves.
 +
<br> They pay more attention to humans and following our directions and commands more effectively.
 +
<br> Von Holdt, a evolutionary biologist, provided the clue that hyperdogs like Marla carry variants of two genes called GTF2I and GTF2IRD1.
 +
<br> If these genes get deleted, Williams syndrome, which is characterized by elfin facial features, cognitive difficulties, and a tendency to love everyone.
 +
<br> Overall, understanding our best friends is basically how domestic dogs are more respondent to us humans.
 +
<br> Website: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/dogs-breeds-pets-wolves
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
----
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
<br> Yellowstone Park helps animals migrate across the American West.
 +
<br> Yellowstone park made a new movement to help the animals migrate by removing some of the barriers humans have thrown up over recent decades.
 +
<br> The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, which spans roughly 18 million acres in and around Yellowstone National Park, has thousands of elk, pronghorn antelope, and mule deer that must migrate across Yellowstone’s rugged landscape in order to reproduce and avoid starvation.
 +
<br>The migration makes the Pronghorn antelope jump over a creak, even though they don’t usually jump; the Elk migrate over an 11,000 foot mountain pass in the Absaroka Mountains on their way towards Yellowstone National Park in the late spring time; and make animals swim across fast-moving rivers.
 +
<br> Other that, many problems other than the migration itself happened; a Pronghorn got its leg caught in a barbed-wire fence.
 +
<br> Because of that, the fence, and many others, have since been removed or retrofitted thanks to a nascent movement to preserve migratory corridors.
 +
<br> Website: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/08/wyoming-yellowstone-pronghorn-migration-news/
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
----
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
<br> Are bears now okay to be hunted?
 +
<br> In the Yellowstone park, the grizzly bears get baited into a cage and wake up with a lip tattoo, an ear tag, and a GPS radio collar attached to them.
 +
<br> Two states say that since the population of grizzly bears increased by a lot, that means three Western states are free to hold highly regulated hunting seasons for the bear.
 +
<br> There are some critics who disagree saying that there is much more bears now than when they were over hunted but that doesn’t mean they can get hunted now for sport.
 +
<br> Protesters such as Jane Goodall, plan to buy up grizzly hunt tickets.
 +
<br> Dan Bjornlie, a large carnivore biologist with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. “But hunting, as long as it’s maintained within the mortality thresholds, is not a threat.”; however, Bonnie Rice, senior representative of the Sierra Club in the Greater Yellowstone and Northern Rockies Region, says “It’s the second-slowest reproducing mammal in North America... It’s a species that can’t take that kind of driving down of the population.”
 +
<br> From these two sides, what do you think about this debate?
 +
<br> Website: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/07/can-grizzly-bears-survive-hunting-animals/
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
----
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
<br> Legal international trade for lion skeletons.
 +
<br> Although the poaching of lions is illegal, South Africa has made the export of skeletons from captive facilities where lions are bred and raised legal.
 +
<br> Lions are already an endangered species so the demand for lion body parts such as, teeth, bones, and claws do not help them.
 +
<br> There are multiple reports on the horrible conditions made by the businesses that sell lion parts.
 +
<br> The businesses also allow customers to pay for the opportunity to kill the lions in which calling it “canned hunting”.
 +
<br> About 8,000 lions live in lion farms and only about 1,300 and 1,700 adult lions remain in the wild.
 +
<br> These terrible businesses shouldn’t be able to continue to sell lion parts because even if lion poaching is illegal, this is basically also killing off the lions into extinction.
 +
<br> Website: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/07/lion-bone-export-south-africa-wildlife-trafficking-news/
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
----
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
<br> Illegal Tiger Trade.
 +
<br> Undercover investigators with the Wildlife Justice Commission visited a tiger farm where people were illegally selling tigers that are hidden in a secret room.
 +
<br> Fewer than 4,000 tigers remain in the wild, but as many as 8,000 are held in captive facilities across China, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam.
 +
<br> The bones of captive tigers are often used for wine or medicinal paste.
 +
<br> The skin of the tiger is used for furniture décor such as rugs or wall hangings.
 +
<br> The teeth may be set in gold and turned into jewelry.
 +
<br> Being able to wear, decorate, and use tiger parts led to people wanting to have them, however this also leads to tiger extinction.
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
----
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
<br> Armored dinosaur found.
 
<br> A plant-eating dinosaur was found in a subtropical continent resembled today's Mississippi.  
 
<br> A plant-eating dinosaur was found in a subtropical continent resembled today's Mississippi.  
 
<br> More than seventy-five million years ago, this dinosaur had lived and died on what scientists now call Laramidia, which was a continent that no longer exists.
 
<br> More than seventy-five million years ago, this dinosaur had lived and died on what scientists now call Laramidia, which was a continent that no longer exists.
<br> The fossils consist of the animal's skull and parts of its skeleton, including its tail club, however the most prominent feature of the dino is the bony knobs dotting its skull that resemble pyramids
+
<br> The fossils consist of the animal's skull and parts of its skeleton, including its tail club, however the most prominent feature of the dino is the bony knobs dotting its skull that resemble pyramids.
 
<br>  Paleontologists named the new ankylosaurid species, Akainacephalus johnsoni, which is also known as “Johnson’s thorny head”.
 
<br>  Paleontologists named the new ankylosaurid species, Akainacephalus johnsoni, which is also known as “Johnson’s thorny head”.
 
<br> Now, the animal's species name honors Randy Johnson, the volunteer fossil preparer who spent thousands of hours cleaning up the dinosaur's skull and lower jaw.
 
<br> Now, the animal's species name honors Randy Johnson, the volunteer fossil preparer who spent thousands of hours cleaning up the dinosaur's skull and lower jaw.
<br>The discovery was amazing.🦕🦖
+
<br>The discovery was amazing.🦕
  
  
Line 17: Line 247:
  
  
<br> Spice enduring mammal  
+
<br> Spice enduring mammal.
<br> Scientists has discovered that humans are not the only mammals who can eat spicy food; Chinese tree     screws were found to be able to eat chili peppers.🌶  
+
<br> Scientists has discovered that humans are not the only mammals who can eat spicy food; Chinese tree screws were found to be able to eat chili peppers.🌶  
 
<br> Researchers found  a mutation in the species’ ion channel receptor, TRPV1, that makes it less sensitive to capsaicin.
 
<br> Researchers found  a mutation in the species’ ion channel receptor, TRPV1, that makes it less sensitive to capsaicin.
 
<br> That acts as a pain receptor on the tongues and throats of mammals, alerting the brain when it comes in contact with harmful heat.
 
<br> That acts as a pain receptor on the tongues and throats of mammals, alerting the brain when it comes in contact with harmful heat.
Line 50: Line 280:
 
Kissing Kits
 
Kissing Kits
  
On the field of Prince Edward Island located in Canada, there were red fox kits playing with each other. 🐾On average there could be up to six fox kits in one litter. They could stay with their parents for up to seven months. The young offspring can be called kits,cubs,whelps,or pups. The red foxes are known to be intelligent and sly. 🐺  
+
On the field of Prince Edward Island located in Canada, there were red fox kits playing with each other. On average there could be up to six fox kits in one litter. They could stay with their parents for up to seven months. The young offspring can be called kits,cubs,whelps,or pups. The red foxes are known to be intelligent and sly. 🐺  
  
  
Line 87: Line 317:
 
' Prehistoric ' shark captured
 
' Prehistoric ' shark captured
  
A shark with a snake head was captured,pulled from the ocean near Portugal. This shark has more than 300 teeth and was around 5 feet in length. From more than 2000 feet below the surface of the sea, it was hauled by a trawler. These Frilled sharks have been around for more than 80 million years but we still don't have enough information on them. This long, slim "living fossil" also poses a large threat to squid🐙 and other fish they are thought to prey on because like their modern cousins(Hammerhead , Great white ect.)they have neddle shaped teeth and the jaws to catch large prey. 🇵🇹  
+
A shark with a snake head was captured,pulled from the ocean near Portugal. This shark has more than 300 teeth and was around 5 feet in length. From more than 2000 feet below the surface of the sea, it was hauled by a trawler. These Frilled sharks have been around for more than 80 million years but we still don't have enough information on them. This long, slim "living fossil" also poses a large threat to squid and other fish they are thought to prey on because like their modern cousins(Hammerhead , Great white ect.)they have neddle shaped teeth and the jaws to catch large prey. 🇵🇹  
  
  
Line 99: Line 329:
 
Whale spa day
 
Whale spa day
  
While studying the Bowhead whales, Sarah Fortune discovered that like humans, Bowhead whales in the Canadian Article pamper them selves. To get rid of loose and dead skin, Bowhead whales rub themselves against giant boulders. Beluga whales and Ocras (killer whales) were known to do this but this was the first known for Bowhead whales. The whales regularly molt, shedding the top layer of dead skin. These whale especially use rocks on Cumberland sound to exfoliate their skin. 🐳 🐋 🌊
+
While studying the Bowhead whales, Sarah Fortune discovered that like humans, Bowhead whales in the Canadian Article pamper themselves. To get rid of loose and dead skin, Bowhead whales rub themselves against giant boulders. Beluga whales and Ocras (killer whales) were known to do this but this was the first known for Bowhead whales. The whales regularly molt, shedding the top layer of dead skin. These whale especially use rocks on Cumberland sound to exfoliate their skin. 🐋  
  
  

Latest revision as of 22:19, 15 October 2018


The Eastern quoll nearly gets extinct.
The Eastern quoll, an adorable little spotted Australian Marsupial, went extinct fifty years ago in the mainland of Australia.
Quolls certainly have a signature look, a face of a mouse, ears of a lemur, a cat-like body and white polka dots on their thick fur.
Quolls are nocturnal and are not picky eaters; they eat insects or carrion, and will hunt rats, rabbits, birds, and lizards—even animals larger than themselves.
For the first time in five decades, the eastern quoll has been introduced back into the wild.
Forty quolls were moved from Tasmania to the Booderee National Park to ensure a increase in this population.
Website: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/08/animals-Australia-quolls-marsupials-extinct-reproduction/







Reasons why Rhinos are having a hard time
Since rhinos are endangered, finding a mate is harder for them.
They live in four isolated regions scattered across 10,000 square miles so even finding another is difficult.
Many wildlife organizations are teaming up to breed rhinos in sanctuaries and increase the population of them.
Due to poaching, as many as seventy percent of the rhino decreased through the years.
A island in Indonesia called Sumatra has less than seventy-five rhinos in the whole place.
The population of those rhinos decreased hugely.
Website: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/10/explore-atlas-sumatran-rhino-critically-endangered-conservation/







Is shark an ingredient in your cosmetics?
It is known that millions of deep-sea sharks are killed for multimillion dollar industries every year but there has also been found in sunscreen, lipstick, foundation, lotion, and many other cosmetics.
Common ingredients for cosmetics is oil, known as squalene, derived from shark livers.
Squalene is a key moisturizing agent for it is high in antioxidants and fatty acid.
Shark-sourced squalene can be found in other types of consumer goods, such as vaccines but ninety percent is used in cosmetics.
Thankfully, many corporations in the western world have made the switch to plant-based squalane, even though it is about thirty percent more expensive to produce.
Website: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/07/sharks-news-cosmetics-squalene-health/







A tiny new species of pygmy seahorse.
In the boulder-strewn coasts of Japan, researchers have discovered tiny seahorses that are the size of a grain of rice.
These creatures camouflage with the algae-covered rocks and at first glance look they look like floating debris in the water.
Scientists have named the seahorse Hippocampus japapigu, Latin for “Japan pig”.
Graham Short, an ichthyologist at the California Academy of Sciences says that it is “because to the locals, it resembles a tiny baby pig”.
Although they are tiny and hard to find because of their appearance, they are not rare.
Website: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/08/tiny-pygmy-seahorse-discovered-japan-news/







Pet-fox DNA tells us a lot about dogs and humans.
In 1959, a man named Dmitri Belyaev started a experiment on how dog’s get trained and domesticated.
So, for almost sixty years Russian scientists have been breeding pet-foxes to be tame or aggressive.
Biologists believed that domestic dogs were descended from wolves, however they didn’t know how all the anatomical, physiological, and behavioral differences between the two animals could arise.
Belyaev had believed that breeding the friendliest foxes together would perhaps become domesticated.
His idea was correct and he got the most fearless tame foxes that are similar to how dogs interact with humans.
Website: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/08/fox-dogs-wild-tame-genetics-study-news/







Ancient way of catching fish.
The ancient Japanese fishing method that uses birds to catch fish is called ukai.
Even though this method has been around for 1,300 years, it is now practiced because it is a popular tourist attraction.
Fishers get the fish by placing a tie on the cormorant’s neck and attaching a leash on the bird.
This way when the cormorants catch the fishes, they can only swallow the small fishes and the big fishes in their mouths get taken by the fisher.
Actor Charlie Chaplin has also described this method as “Japan’s highest art form”.
Website: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/08/ukai-comorant-fishing-japan-news/







Breeding reorganized dog’s brains.
Since the first wolf was domesticated an estimated 12,000 years ago, variety of dogs were bred and many more different kinds of dogs were made.
A new brain-imaging study examined the carcasses of eleven different dogs and breeds.
Scientists found that the brains of many short-snouted breeds have shifted forwards about fifteen degrees.
Researchers say that this perhaps significantly alters the dogs' all-important source of smell.
It is a wonder on how breeding can change a something like a sense of smell; researchers say that is a question to look forward into.
Website: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/08/100803-dogs-brains-changed-breeding-science/







Can dogs feel our emotions?
It is already known that sometimes dogs yawn when they see others yawn but they don’t know if it is considered a form of empathy or mild stress, as yawning can be caused by anxiety.
In a test it was determined that not only did the dog yawn more to their owners but also yawned less to fake yawns.
In a similar study before, scientists claimed that people yawn more when people they care about yawn.
So, they believe that contagious yawning is a form of empathizing with people experiencing a feeling.
Elisabetta Palagi, of the Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies in Rome, says "This could be the result of a long process of domestication.”
Website: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/08/130808-yawning-dogs-contagious-animals-empathy-science/







Why Are Dogs So Friendly?
Dogs are more sociable than their wild cousins, the wolves.
They pay more attention to humans and following our directions and commands more effectively.
Von Holdt, a evolutionary biologist, provided the clue that hyperdogs like Marla carry variants of two genes called GTF2I and GTF2IRD1.
If these genes get deleted, Williams syndrome, which is characterized by elfin facial features, cognitive difficulties, and a tendency to love everyone.
Overall, understanding our best friends is basically how domestic dogs are more respondent to us humans.
Website: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/dogs-breeds-pets-wolves







Yellowstone Park helps animals migrate across the American West.
Yellowstone park made a new movement to help the animals migrate by removing some of the barriers humans have thrown up over recent decades.
The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, which spans roughly 18 million acres in and around Yellowstone National Park, has thousands of elk, pronghorn antelope, and mule deer that must migrate across Yellowstone’s rugged landscape in order to reproduce and avoid starvation.
The migration makes the Pronghorn antelope jump over a creak, even though they don’t usually jump; the Elk migrate over an 11,000 foot mountain pass in the Absaroka Mountains on their way towards Yellowstone National Park in the late spring time; and make animals swim across fast-moving rivers.
Other that, many problems other than the migration itself happened; a Pronghorn got its leg caught in a barbed-wire fence.
Because of that, the fence, and many others, have since been removed or retrofitted thanks to a nascent movement to preserve migratory corridors.
Website: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/08/wyoming-yellowstone-pronghorn-migration-news/







Are bears now okay to be hunted?
In the Yellowstone park, the grizzly bears get baited into a cage and wake up with a lip tattoo, an ear tag, and a GPS radio collar attached to them.
Two states say that since the population of grizzly bears increased by a lot, that means three Western states are free to hold highly regulated hunting seasons for the bear.
There are some critics who disagree saying that there is much more bears now than when they were over hunted but that doesn’t mean they can get hunted now for sport.
Protesters such as Jane Goodall, plan to buy up grizzly hunt tickets.
Dan Bjornlie, a large carnivore biologist with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. “But hunting, as long as it’s maintained within the mortality thresholds, is not a threat.”; however, Bonnie Rice, senior representative of the Sierra Club in the Greater Yellowstone and Northern Rockies Region, says “It’s the second-slowest reproducing mammal in North America... It’s a species that can’t take that kind of driving down of the population.”
From these two sides, what do you think about this debate?
Website: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/07/can-grizzly-bears-survive-hunting-animals/







Legal international trade for lion skeletons.
Although the poaching of lions is illegal, South Africa has made the export of skeletons from captive facilities where lions are bred and raised legal.
Lions are already an endangered species so the demand for lion body parts such as, teeth, bones, and claws do not help them.
There are multiple reports on the horrible conditions made by the businesses that sell lion parts.
The businesses also allow customers to pay for the opportunity to kill the lions in which calling it “canned hunting”.
About 8,000 lions live in lion farms and only about 1,300 and 1,700 adult lions remain in the wild.
These terrible businesses shouldn’t be able to continue to sell lion parts because even if lion poaching is illegal, this is basically also killing off the lions into extinction.
Website: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/07/lion-bone-export-south-africa-wildlife-trafficking-news/







Illegal Tiger Trade.
Undercover investigators with the Wildlife Justice Commission visited a tiger farm where people were illegally selling tigers that are hidden in a secret room.
Fewer than 4,000 tigers remain in the wild, but as many as 8,000 are held in captive facilities across China, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam.
The bones of captive tigers are often used for wine or medicinal paste.
The skin of the tiger is used for furniture décor such as rugs or wall hangings.
The teeth may be set in gold and turned into jewelry.
Being able to wear, decorate, and use tiger parts led to people wanting to have them, however this also leads to tiger extinction.







Armored dinosaur found.
A plant-eating dinosaur was found in a subtropical continent resembled today's Mississippi.
More than seventy-five million years ago, this dinosaur had lived and died on what scientists now call Laramidia, which was a continent that no longer exists.
The fossils consist of the animal's skull and parts of its skeleton, including its tail club, however the most prominent feature of the dino is the bony knobs dotting its skull that resemble pyramids.
Paleontologists named the new ankylosaurid species, Akainacephalus johnsoni, which is also known as “Johnson’s thorny head”.
Now, the animal's species name honors Randy Johnson, the volunteer fossil preparer who spent thousands of hours cleaning up the dinosaur's skull and lower jaw.
The discovery was amazing.🦕







Spice enduring mammal.
Scientists has discovered that humans are not the only mammals who can eat spicy food; Chinese tree screws were found to be able to eat chili peppers.🌶
Researchers found a mutation in the species’ ion channel receptor, TRPV1, that makes it less sensitive to capsaicin.
That acts as a pain receptor on the tongues and throats of mammals, alerting the brain when it comes in contact with harmful heat.
Scientists say that the mutation is a evolutionary adaptation to expand the range of the tree screws diet.
With their mutations, tree shrews don’t feel as much pain from spicy food.
If you like spicy food then, you have something in common with the Chinese tree screw!






Halloween sky

In the sky's of Halloween night there is said to have ghostly figures shown around the constellation Cepheus. Many star constellations are known back as far as the Aztec civilizations. They believed it as legends associated with the moon. What is said to be creepier is that the monster seems to be winking at the star gazers. Even with these theories, keen eyed trick-o-treaters often search for a ghoul.🎃






Kissing Kits

On the field of Prince Edward Island located in Canada, there were red fox kits playing with each other. On average there could be up to six fox kits in one litter. They could stay with their parents for up to seven months. The young offspring can be called kits,cubs,whelps,or pups. The red foxes are known to be intelligent and sly. 🐺






Hello, Spring

Spring is the time of year when Sakura trees, are also called Cherry Blossom trees. Their flowers bloom the most beautiful soft pink color. Many birds come to visit the trees inspecting the offerings given to them by the radiant blossoms. The cherry blossoms are also the national flower of Japan. From this, the Spring time of year is "Japan's busiest tourist season."🇯🇵🌸






Earth-sided planet

11 light years away, there is a dim red star called Ross 128b. These dwarf planets are everywhere however what makes it special is the fact that it has seven Earth sized planets in it orbital embrace. Actually, the closest Earth sized planet in Ross 128b's orbital embrace is Proxima b. This is a great discovery even though all the Earth like planets are nothing like Earth. People still want to find out if Earth has a twin. 🌏 👩👩






' Prehistoric ' shark captured

A shark with a snake head was captured,pulled from the ocean near Portugal. This shark has more than 300 teeth and was around 5 feet in length. From more than 2000 feet below the surface of the sea, it was hauled by a trawler. These Frilled sharks have been around for more than 80 million years but we still don't have enough information on them. This long, slim "living fossil" also poses a large threat to squid and other fish they are thought to prey on because like their modern cousins(Hammerhead , Great white ect.)they have neddle shaped teeth and the jaws to catch large prey. 🇵🇹






Whale spa day

While studying the Bowhead whales, Sarah Fortune discovered that like humans, Bowhead whales in the Canadian Article pamper themselves. To get rid of loose and dead skin, Bowhead whales rub themselves against giant boulders. Beluga whales and Ocras (killer whales) were known to do this but this was the first known for Bowhead whales. The whales regularly molt, shedding the top layer of dead skin. These whale especially use rocks on Cumberland sound to exfoliate their skin. 🐋






Tenzing's Page (Articles all from National Geographic)